The Value of Handwriting in the Digital Age: http://bit.ly/1B7B4pE

The Value of Handwriting in the Digital Age: http://bit.ly/1B7B4pE

Handwriting is far more useful than probably most people realize in this age of smart phones, Tablets, iPads, and school-issued computing equipment. I want to inspire you to think about what useful skill your kids or grandkids might be missing out on, unless you help them. And helping them can be easy!

Umm, handwriting. What’s that?

Before digital equipment was everywhere all the time, ordinary people had to write out homework, write out shopping lists, leave personal notes to each other, jot down phone messages, fill out job applications, write personal letters of correspondence, and many other things—all by hand. Once drafted by hand, finished business documents and letters where usually typed on a typewriter for a neat appearance, but even professionals kept daily records and accounting by hand. The smoother and faster a person could write by hand, the better their life ran and the better the impression they made on other people.

Now, almost every form of communication to oneself or anyone else is done by typing on a digital device of some kind, and everyone is constantly connected with texting, Tweeting, Pinning, Flikr-ing, emailing, occasionally cell-phoning, and there are a host of other “online” applications popping up to make sorting, storing, sharing, and using endless information supposedly easier. When does anyone write more than three words by hand? . . . And when people do write with a pen or pencil, many people don’t use cursive because they never learned the awesome advantage of cursive—SPEED.

Writing by hand is technically handwriting, but when each letter is formed individually it’s called printing (the words look like a sloppy version of machine printing). The best handwriting is called cursive—that’s the kind that flows with every letter of a word connected to the next letter.

What people are missing out on is the speed of cursive handwriting: http://bit.ly/1xQjllD

What people are missing out on is the speed of cursive handwriting.

Evidence that the usefulness of handwriting in the digital age is not widely understood.

In recent years some schools stopped teaching cursive handwriting. Whether your school has continued, stopped, or started it up again, you may want to take note of the issue and personally show your kids or grandkids the value of handwriting so that they can enjoy the benefits throughout their lives.

I’ve seen professional adults who have trouble writing by hand, but occasionally have to do it.

If you’re one who is so familiar with cursive that you use it without thinking, you may not realize that it is not guaranteed for the next generation. Imagine if the subject of math was canceled because calculators are everywhere? Ridiculous. Imagine the inconvenience of shopping or cooking if you couldn’t do simple math in your head. It’s up to us to make sure our kids are learning the skills we take for granted.

If handwriting in cursive is presented as just another thing that must be memorized, it will be unappreciated and tossed aside by the child as soon as possible. Someone must show kids not only how to write in cursive, but how fast it can be done, and also point out how much time the method can save for the child in the months and years ahead.

Why is cursive so fast?

Because it is designed so that your writing instrument seldom leaves the page—every word is made with ONE flowing line. When printing by hand, every letter is made of at least one separate mark, many require two marks, and an “E” is often done with THREE separate marks. The word “separate” takes SEVENTEEN marks to print in all caps, or TEN marks to print in individual lowercase letters, but only TWO to make in cursive!

Cursive is like rolling down a hill on a skateboard, and hand printing is like taking all the steps to walk down the hill. If you just want to get to the bottom so you can play, you’ll take the skateboard—provided someone has shown you how to use it!

BONUS: Cursive is so flowing that it does not feel tedious like printing can. Try writing an entire page by hand with lowercase print, and all those little movements will likely make you feel like throwing down your pen and shaking your hand. Once you’re practiced in cursive however, you can soar through handwriting an entire page easily and comfortably.

Cursive is the fastest handwriting BECAUSE it requires far fewer separate marks: http://bit.ly/1B7B4pE

Cursive is the fastest handwriting BECAUSE it requires far fewer separate marks: http://bit.ly/1B7B4pE

So why care which is the fastest way to hand write when we type everything?

Two points: we type more than we would if we knew how to write super fast; and we need to be able to cope better when batteries fail, programs crash, or devices are too expensive.

I’ve had people tell me they lost everyone’s phone numbers and addresses because their phone messed up, but that wouldn’t have happened if they kept a written address book as backup. How much time do you spend entering info into an electronic device when you could jot it on a piece of paper and stuff it into a pocket? I’ve heard things on the radio I wanted to look into, and reached for a pencil and paper to take notes faster than I ever could have opened an appropriate program on a computer or smart phone. Maybe students think they can type notes while listening to a lecture just as fast as someone could hand write notes, but what about when they show up only to find out that their laptop battery died, their word processing program froze without saving, or the operating system crashed? What about when their computer is so old that it becomes too slow, but they can’t afford a new one? Everyone should have the ability to handwrite as a backup.

If people knew how to write well and fast, they wouldn’t be so concerned with somebody paying to ensure electronic devices are everywhere!

And once we have the ability to write smoothly, quickly, and easily, we will not only find it’s nice to give and receive notes and letters that are personally written rather than digitally delivered, we’ll also find ourselves writing all sorts of little notes, signs, lists, etc.

You have to be able to do something before you discover advantageous opportunities for doing it. When someone can’t cook, they eat prepared meals and think it’s fine; but once they learn how to cook something fresh and wonderful, they realize they like it better. People who can’t read manage somehow to get through life, but those of us who know how to read also know the advantages. There are advantages to knowing cursive!

Making sure your kids or grandkids learn cursive can be fairly simple.

If you are not very fast with cursive yourself, practice a little before talking to your child about it. Once you’ve got it down, pick a few words–anything–and have the child write them. If you have a clock that shows seconds, time the child’s writing; but if not just have the child mentally notice how long it take him or her to write, compared with how fast you can write the same words. After the child writes the words, you write them first in print (individual letters) and then even faster in cursive. When you do the cursive, do it as fast as you can, legibly but without trying to be pretty—act like someone is talking and you have to write as fast as they talk. Your child should be amazed at how much faster you can write then he or she can, and that will be the key to getting cooperation. Remind them that they will spend less time writing and more time playing, if they learn such a fast writing method!

Point out to your child every time you write something. When you write a check, add to the grocery list, post a sticky note, whatever—so the child sees that there is writing to be done in real adult life.

Hopefully your child will be excited to learn, but if the child protests learning cursive handwriting, simply tell them they absolutely have to do it. Mater of fact. No arguing. You know it’s worth their time, and they will know it too once they learn it. Don’t make it a drudgery by insisting on too much practice—copying one sentence which uses all twenty six letters is enough for each session. You’re trying to convey that cursive writing is faster than the alternative, so practicing it should also be a brief chore.

Then start looking for times to have your child write one or two words in script, like having them add an item to the grocery list for you. As the child uses cursive several times per week, they will get used to it and begin to like it.

When my son was little, he endlessly whined and fussed about it being a waste of time to learn cursive when he already know how to write. But I made him practice just a sentence or so at a time, maybe a few times a week. I can’t remember how many weeks it took, but once he had the cursive form of every letter of the alphabet well memorized (including how to connect them to each other), there was no going back—he CHOSE to write EVERYTHING in cursive, because it was SO much faster for him. I even had to show him that on certain types of projects, for visual clarity, he should hand print the words rather than use cursive (like for document titles, or for when he had to write extremely small). Cursive has become my standard example when he doesn’t think he will ever need or want whatever it is that I’m telling him to learn. He even feels sorry for his young friends who, because they haven’t mastered cursive, can’t read what he’s written and also struggle with their own homework or other projects.

Give your child or grandchild the gift of knowing cursive handwriting.

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© 2015 Noname Porter-Mcshirley

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Moods are symptoms. Don’t just react. Look under the surface and connect with the other person to solve or even prevent an outburst, tantrum, or other negative behavior.

I talked about this in a previous post, “Pain Is the Root Of Anger, and Why You Should Care” but today I’d like to amplify that by sharing the following post by Rebecca Thompson, M.S., MFT.

Her blog is about parenting, and this post of hers in particular reminded me of when my son was a toddler and he would routinely become annoying, fussy, and troublesome when he was tired. It was an irritating distraction for work-at-home parents. Of course the instantaneous reactionary impulse was to be short with him, tell him to stop being that way, even yell at him. But I wanted to love and help him, not hurt him. I found that all I had to do when he started acting badly, was realize that he had been awake for hours, and then pick him up and rock him on my shoulder. He felt the loving connection and quickly fell asleep. When he awoke, he was always able to behave much better.

For older kids too big to hold or too old for naps, a hug can be just as refreshing–like rebooting a computer which has clogged up and can’t function right.

For even older people or those you aren’t so personal with, look for a way to give a verbal hug. A kind word, compliment, or some acknowledgement that you are sympathetic.

Meeting and treating on a personal root level works with a person of any age—infant, toddler, teen, adult, and elderly. It can even work with animals.

Read Rebecca’s post: An Alternative View of Tantrums and Emotional Upsets

Or visit her website by clicking this image:

 

© NPM

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Being natural bodies, we fall under the power of inertia.

When we’re working, really working, we’re often energized and propelled by seeing progress, making small accomplishments, checking items off our to-do list, knowing that we’re finally moving in the right direction. We want to keep going to see bigger victories and reach the end of a project or mission. At least we want to finish something, some stage of work, so we can move on and not have to come back to it later.

If you were writing a report or email when someone yelled “quitting time,” would you stop in the middle of a word, or say “okay, just let me finish this sentence”? (And you’d probably keep going at least to the end of the paragraph!) If you were wiping a counter and saw food dribbled down the cabinet front, you’d wipe that too, and then seeing some on the floor you would clean that up too, which would lead you to see the pet’s empty water bowl which happens to be in need of washing before filling. While you might be thinking “when will I ever be done!?!” you would keep going because you are in motion and one thing leads to another.

When we’re at rest, we feel like staying at rest, either because we’ve worn ourselves way down with our overly long work sessions, and/or because it’s easier to dream than to act. It’s easier to worry and procrastinate than to get the blood flowing through our muscles and brains. Just thinking of all the work we have to do makes us feel tired and lost. We want another hour of rest before facing what feels like a loosing battle with life. (Hint: when we have a schedule, we don’t always have to think about all of our work—usually only the next thing on the schedule.)

When we are working there are always more things to do. When we are resting there are always other positions to roll into, limbs to stretch or retract, dreams to be watched.

But we are not only natural bodies. We are also spiritual beings inhabiting our bodies like exosuits. And it is supposed to be our spirits in control of our bodies. We are supposed to choose what’s wise and make ourselves enact wisdom. Wisdom doesn’t rely solely on willpower—it adds strategic management.

One of the delights in being self-employed is supposed to be the freedom to work when we want to, and not when we don’t want to. But that is only viable once we learn to value work and know how to motivate and schedule ourselves.

If left to my own tendencies I would probably have a 34 hour day/night cycle, but God only designed a 24 hour cycle for us. I believe He had reasons.

I’ve discovered that working to the end of one project, while other things pile up, collapsing in exhaustion and resting until bed-ache or an outside force (or family member) demands wakefulness, and then tackling another mountain of work of one sort other until that pile’s cleared away, is NOT efficient—or healthy.

You might think for instance, washing dishes only once per week would be more efficient than washing after every meal. That not thinking about laundry until you had a washer-worth of each type (lights, darks, reds, whites) would let you focus on other things for a week or two. That piling up unsorted receipts, and sorting out accounting and taxes all at once annually would be most efficient. Wrong, wrong, and wrong.

While there are sometimes real advantages to grouping work into batches, cutting down on time required to get things in and out and switch mental gears from one task to another, this definition of efficiency has to be kept in check. There can also be a disadvantage we should examine—the ripple effect on life flow.

Cooking and serving in the second half of the week may take longer and be far more frustrating when the most appropriate dishes are in the dirty pile from three days before, and are filling up half of the available counter space. Picking out an appropriate outfit for your day may also take longer and be less satisfactory when most of your clothes are dirty and waiting for that one big laundry day. Finding time for several days of sorting, categorizing, and adding up income and expenses can not only be hard, but it also means pushing a week’s worth of everything else off track every Spring.

You’ll also find that you work smarter, think clearer and faster, and feel more cheerful and creative when you go to sleep before you’re on the verge of illness, and get a sensible amount of sleep at least several nights per week.

So we need a schedule where everything gets done when it’s best for the flow of everything else. A little of this and a little of that, to keep every department of our lives running well. If you don’t believe me, try imagining the only grocery store in town saying that it’s more efficient to restock everything at once. What if they didn’t care that half of the shelves were empty and you couldn’t buy what you wanted, because there was still half a store’s worth of something for sale? And then what if everyone had to wait outside in line for three days while the whole store was restocked at once? This is an example of the ripple effect “efficiency” can have on the rest of life flow. It can be very inefficient for everything it touches.

The surprising part is that we will find that we seem to have more time–enough time–when we both have a good plan, and stick to it. That’s because we won’t be wasting time in confusion, frustration, and depression. You probably don’t know how much time those negatives take until you free yourself from them.

If your life is complex or you have many responsibilities, you may find it hard to make a plan or schedule which you can stick to. It takes thought over a period of time, and trial and error. Be willing to adjust when you find what won’t work.

I think my biggest problems with scheduling were being unrealistic with how fast I could work, not planning bumper time (for interruptions, bathroom trips, switching between tasks, etc), no allotment for the unexpected, and leaving no time for catching up when a project or chore didn’t fit it’s time slot. For years I refused to make a realistic schedule because I refused to accept it might take years to do as much as I wanted to accomplish in months. But I’ve found a time saver—a magic way to get more out of each day.

What’s important is to accept when you’ve found a workable schedule or plan, and then “just do it!” Know when to stop thinking thoughts like, “I wish I had a plan,” “I just don’t know how to get it all done,” “I’ll have to give up some sleep.”

Just do it” saves time. I’ll explain.

When you hear “stick to the plan” I’m sure that triggers the protest that our plans can’t take into consideration the unknown future, so we’re bound to have to go with the flow and that means we’ll get behind again, so no schedule is going to work. That’s what I used to think. However I’ve learned that the best defense here is to swap. For example, if you’ve scheduled an afternoon at the computer and your spouse invites you out on a date or your kid gets sick, tend to the family today but make sure you reschedule (and accomplish) that afternoon worth of computer work on the next day where you had intended family time. But only swap when it’s wise to, not when your whim dictates.

So I’ll say it again: once you have a workable schedule, just do it! Whether you feel like it or not, you can just do it. Do what your plan calls for, when it calls for it. If you’re scheduled to load the washer tonight, do it. Don’t say to yourself, “oh I know I’m supposed to wash laundry, but I have clothes for tomorrow and I just want to go to bed. It will be okay.” You could have done it in the same time it took you to debate and excuse yourself. Stay on track and you’ll feel incredibly energized! Telling yourself “Just do it!” is like revving your own engine—you’ll go farther faster. You’ll rest better knowing you’re on track, and wake up happier knowing your not starting the day behind on your chores.

Once you have a good schedule, you won’t have to constantly waste time thinking about what you’re forgetting to do, trying to figure out where to start, calculating what will happen if you put something off, and wallowing in negative thoughts.

Every time you “just do it” you find out you can do it, which makes you feel like you can do anything. And you can. Without wasting energy and time thinking and rethinking the routine and mundane, you’ll have more time and energy for bigger and better things. After a while your schedule will become habitual, and that will free up even more time and energy for whatever you choose.

ANOTHER TIP: Once you have scheduled time periods for each type of work, be thoughtful to choose the most important or forward-moving activity for that category. For instance, if you’ve allotted one hour with your child, which adds most to the quality of your relationship: passively watching a TV show together, or interacting imaginatively with action figures? If you only have an hour per week for social media, decide which will move you closer to your goal: to write a blog post, browse other people’s FaceBook pages, Tweet encouraging responses to other people, search for an ezine which might publish your article, or what? Accept the length of time you have for a type of work, and focus on using that time slot wisely.

“To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven…” (Ecclesiastes 3).  It’s our job to discipline ourselves to do the right things at the right times.

 

© NPM

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Happy Endings Have a Purpose

December 19, 2012


My nine-year-old son and I both “booed” after finishing a short story which started with two children being left alone on an island, and ended with them still there, abandoned by their only visitor, and one of the children vowing to find a way off of the island some day. I tried to console my son by saying that when I experience a sad story that ends without an “ending,” it makes me resolve to get busy making something happen in real life. I asked him, “Do stories always have to have a happy ending?” I continued, “Real life doesn’t have happy endings—it just keeps going and going.” To which he instantly replied, “That’s why we turn to stories!”

I think he’s right.

Most adults are busy, and we can sometimes accept taking a piece of a story to ponder its points as we go on with our activities; but remember being a kid, when a year seemed like eternity? Adults may have been around enough to know a hard time will pass in a day, or week, or year; but it’s hard for a child to hold out for relief which might be so far away—so they turn to fantasy. Time goes so slowly for children that they can’t always grasp from their own real lives, the sense of hope and joy they need; but they can get it from a happy ending to a story.

We all want to know that things will be okay in the end—the end of a situation, the end of a season of life, or the absolute end of one’s earthly life. We need hope for the future in order to keep going through anything less than perfect. We fuel that hope with stories, real and fictional. Stories give us a rest from our reality, and ideas to take back into reality. Sure, we can draw positive thoughts from a story that stops sadly, but that’s work, not recreation. We all–adults and children–need happy endings to feel relaxed and happy.

Life does keep going and going, but with lots of little happy moments, if not “endings.” For those who say that kids should not be taught to expect happy endings in life, I’d say they should be allowed the uplifting pleasure of happy endings in stories, AND taught to both look for and create happy passages in real life.

It doesn’t matter so much that life isn’t “happy EVER after” ONE struggle. It does matter that we CAN get through a struggle, and be happy—and so then we must be able to get through another struggle, and another. A happy ending gives hope for multiple happy endings to multiple struggles.

So don’t feel guilty for filling your kid’s heads with happy endings. And do make happiness come true, even in difficult times.

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©NPM

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While searching blogs tonight, I came accross this great story of a little girl whose fanciful tale was published along with some other children’s stories, and how excited she was to see her own words in a book, and to see what other kids had written…

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http://rachelsbooknook.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/write4fun-35/

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I know that post was some time ago, but NOW all English-speaking kids ages 5 to 13 have an opportunity for the same kind of exciting, positive experience.

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Enjoy reading the post in the above link, and then have YOUR kids enter Rifll Publishing’s FREE Kid’s Challenge/contest right now! (Or mark it on tomorrow’s schedule, if you are reading this while your kids sleep.)

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Get all your questions answered here:   http://www.rifll.com/challenge.htm

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Why do I have to write, mom?...What if it got published?...My writing, published?...Yup! Go to:  http://www.rifll.com/challenge.htm

Give your child the thrill of being published, plus challenge him or her to coming in First Place. Help your child enter now! http://www.rifll.com/challenge.htm ~Share the fun: invite friends & followers to participate.

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ATTENTION ANYONE WHO:
has kids, knows kids, works with kids, or has a social media audience who has (or are) kids.

Rifll Publishing, Inc. is looking to tell all the kids ages 5 to 13 about a fun contest they can win.

You DON’T have to think your kid is the world’s next great author. And your kids DON’T have to love writing to enter. Rifll’s rules are simple; check them out, help a kid submit something, and the fun will follow!

Several First Place winners will be offered contracts to have their entries published in a paperback anthology of writings by kids and for kids.

All other entries will receive Second Place, and receive the option of being posted on a special page of Rifll Publishing’s website.

When’s the last time you knew of a child who had the pleasure of showing friends and family something he or she wrote, displayed on the internet; or had the pleasure of holding in their hands a book full of stories written by folks their own age?

Now you can help make that possible, for FREE.

Kids CAN write things that are fun and worth reading, and this challenge can ENCOURAGE them to love writing and reading.

Help your kids to enter.

Also please POST THIS to your blog, FaceBook, Twitter, email it out; tell your coworkers, your kids’ friends, teachers, and youth groups.

The more entries, the more fun!

See the simple details and answers to your questions on Rifll’s website: http://www.rifll.com/challenge.htm

Kid's Writing Challenge (contest) Deadline 12-31-12 ~ www.rifll.com

Kid’s Writing Challenge (contest) Deadline 12-31-12 ~ http://www.rifll.com
Kids ages 5-13 can enter & win publication!
Share the news. Help kids enter now!

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When “all options are on the table,” it is too easy to settle for the wrong option, thinking it’s the only viable or fast enough way.

When the wrong options are removed from the choices you make available to yourself, and the remaining selection isn’t appealing, you are forced to try to discover new options and good ways to enact the best option found.

Ozma of Oz would never have discovered a way to turn the evil spirits into agreeable spirits, if she had accepted the much-offered option of defensive fighting. Because she ruled out that response as not being an option, then she and her friends had time to notice not only a better solution, but one which might actually succeed; and then having chosen a good option, they were committed enough to give a needed nudge in the right place to make it work.

Think you can justify yourself in saying “all options are on the table” in order to surprise your enemies with your selected option? Never mind. Either you are willing to do anything to meet your goals, or else you are lying; and if you aren’t the type to choose wrong, then your opponent will know what is not really “on your table” anyway. You’ll have to do better than that to be surprising.

Don’t be lazy. Cast away wrong options for meeting your goals; then if you can’t find anything left, reconsider your goals and be patiently watchful for new options to arise.

© NPM

To see my books in print, please visit  www.Amazon.com  or www.BarnesAndNoble.com  OR visit my publisher’s website: www.rifll.com