Frost on our storm door looked like large beautiful jungle plants light by morning sunshine from a clearing in the woods.

Frost on our storm door looked like large beautiful jungle plants lit by morning sunshine from a clearing in the woods.

 

“Mom, do you think the frost on our door is so beautiful because I’m always so happy?” asked my son.

He had previously looked at the awesome book, Hidden Messages in Water, where scientist Masaru Emoto showed how positive and negative words spoken at–or even just thought toward–containers of water had real effects on the pattern of crystals when the water was frozen.

When looking at that book, my son remembered that a Ferengi in Star Trek The Next Generation had referred to humans as “ugly bags of mostly water.” And in fact, according to Dr. Jeffrey Utz (Neuroscience, pediatrics, Allegheny University, as cited by U.S. Geological Survey), humans are 55-65 percent water (except infants which are born at about 78 percent). Or humans are “about 70 percent water” according to NASA, which might be outdated truth since Dr. Utz goes on to say that basically the fatter a person is the lower their percentage of body water–and obviously the populace is getting fatter all the time, so we probably do average closer to 55 percent than 70 these days. But I digress.

The point is that if we’re made up of a high percentage of water, and a thought or word can affect water, it can have a physical effect on our bodies! And on all sorts of other things around us.

The idea that “words can’t hurt” has been outdated for decades, but while you can’t always control what words are spoken to you, you absolutely can learn to always control the ideas and emotions which you allow to linger inside your own head and which then resonate throughout not only your whole body, but also throughout everybody around you, manipulating energy and matter throughout your entire corner of the universe.

If you want more evidence of the power of thought, read “Dying To Be Me: My Journey from Cancer, to Near Death, to True Healing” by Anita Moorjani.

You carry an invisible tool that does not require the lifting of a finger to operate. You have the power to affect creation, your health, and everyone around you. Will you choose to wield it wisely, kindly and positively?

Trying to be vigilant in controlling your thoughts and emotions is as tiring and impossible as pushing a train everywhere you want to go. However, if you get that train onto the right track, it will roll smoothly and take you where you want to go on very little fuel. As you learn to have the right outlook and manner of thinking, maintaining a positive outlook and joyful mood will become who you are automatically, rather than an act you have to maintain.

Beauty and goodness is everywhere to be appreciated and enjoyed, to uplift and enrich— especially if you put it there! Think it. See it. Be it.

Love, understanding, and true joy to you 🙂

Bright and beautiful frost in the pattern of leaves, woodland plants, or seaweed.

Bright and beautiful frost in the pattern of leaves, woodland plants, or seaweed.

Our frosty storm door, with a different lighting angle and camera exposure, looked like a shady woodland scene opening into a sunny field.

Our frosty storm door, with a different lighting angle and camera exposure, looked like a shady woodland scene opening into a sunny field.

 

 

Noname Porter-McShirley  © 2015 Noname Porter-Mcshirley

.

 

Juncture

The present is both
The past of the future
And the future of the past.
And the point of pointing this out
Is hopefully to compel you
To take a step back from going forward
To consider where you’re going.

~Noname Porter-McShirley

 

Juncture, by Noname Porter-McShirley

Juncture, by Noname Porter-McShirley

It seems one of the hens was out to prove they don’t make egg cartons big enough.

She must have put a lot of extra energy into producing these out-of-the-ordinary creations…and into laying them! Ouch!

Super Jumbo Eggs

Working overtime: One of the chickens was out to prove they don’t make egg cartons big enough.

.

(Please share the illustration from below the text.)

.

Is living or working in a cramped or cluttered space driving you crazy?

You wish you had storage room to put stuff away, and more organization, and more money and time to make things the way you want them; or maybe you wish you could make some other person clear up their mess which is perpetually in your way. Maybe you’ll get that, but not today.

So put all that aside for a minute.  Freeze. Take a breath. Today is the day you have in front of you, the day you feel the oppression building, and the day you want to feel great, be productive and radiate happiness. Right now, here’s an instant help—a mood and brain pick-me-up…

Stop always standing or sitting in the middle of your space.
At least for one minute.

I know you have to be close to your work to work on it, but being in the middle means your face is close to stuff no matter which way you turn. The cubic free space is also divided into smaller, unnoticed chunks, which visually mix with chunks of stuff.

Stand with your back in a corner or, against a wall or door.

Standing (or sitting) with your back against a corner or wall will allow all the space which is usually around and behind you to meet unobstructed, blending into a relatively large open area; it will also put all that space between you and the stuff that you’re tired of looking at.

Do it every chance you get!

Move back against a corner or wall any time you have a minute or more that you’re not hands-on with your work, like when you are answering the phone, drinking water or tea, eating a cookie, stretching, deciding your next chore, hugging your child, etc..  Move back and look into the opened-up space.

Don’t eat your cereal at the breakfast bar in the middle of the kitchen; eat sitting in a chair off in a corner, facing into the open space you’ve just walked out of. This will allow you a moment of physical AND emotional relaxation.

Don’t eat at the computer. See how much better you feel sitting on the floor with your lunch, on the opposite side of the room. Or try swiveling your chair with your back to your computer, and looking into a different part of the room while you munch.

Surprising additional benefits.

There is a benefit to this idea beyond giving yourself a time-out from feeling claustrophobically overwhelmed with both endless work and ever-growing chaos. You may find that stepping back occasionally to enjoy the space you never knew you had, also calms and resets your thinking enough to let happy new ideas and creative new solutions come to the front of your consciousness. You may see a way to quicken or lessen your workload. Or you may see a less stressful, and more grateful, way to think about things.

Take a literal step back, and a deep breath, and smile—as often as you can.

You may not have enough space for what you want, but now you know how to make your invisible space visible—and that can be a wonderful treat!

Being at the CORNER of Your Area Consolidates Free Space & Moves You Farther from the Mess. A Refreshing Breath of Space = a Mood-Lift.

©NPM

.

“I bought a wooden whistle and it woodn’ whistle.
So I bought a steel whistle, and it steel woodn’ whistle!
So I bought a tin whistle. Now I tin whistle.”

That’s from a very good scene in the four-time award-winning wonderful movie, Sweet Landhttp://www.amazon.com/Sweet-Land-Story-Elizabeth-Reaser/dp/B000P5FH26/

The movie is billed as a love story, but it’s not a simple chick-flick. It’s more about life, work, prejudice, respect, and choosing to love.

I have a favorite line from the movie, but if you haven’t seen it yet, I don’t want to tell you the line because it’s best heard in the movie’s timing. I will warn you though, that you have to listen close to this movie or you’ll miss a lot of value. This is a movie which while slow at times, takes all of your attention—and maybe a second watching.

I hope you get to see the film if you haven’t already, but in any case, you can make people smile and chuckle with the above rhyme 🙂

© NPM

.

Happy Endings Have a Purpose

December 19, 2012


My nine-year-old son and I both “booed” after finishing a short story which started with two children being left alone on an island, and ended with them still there, abandoned by their only visitor, and one of the children vowing to find a way off of the island some day. I tried to console my son by saying that when I experience a sad story that ends without an “ending,” it makes me resolve to get busy making something happen in real life. I asked him, “Do stories always have to have a happy ending?” I continued, “Real life doesn’t have happy endings—it just keeps going and going.” To which he instantly replied, “That’s why we turn to stories!”

I think he’s right.

Most adults are busy, and we can sometimes accept taking a piece of a story to ponder its points as we go on with our activities; but remember being a kid, when a year seemed like eternity? Adults may have been around enough to know a hard time will pass in a day, or week, or year; but it’s hard for a child to hold out for relief which might be so far away—so they turn to fantasy. Time goes so slowly for children that they can’t always grasp from their own real lives, the sense of hope and joy they need; but they can get it from a happy ending to a story.

We all want to know that things will be okay in the end—the end of a situation, the end of a season of life, or the absolute end of one’s earthly life. We need hope for the future in order to keep going through anything less than perfect. We fuel that hope with stories, real and fictional. Stories give us a rest from our reality, and ideas to take back into reality. Sure, we can draw positive thoughts from a story that stops sadly, but that’s work, not recreation. We all–adults and children–need happy endings to feel relaxed and happy.

Life does keep going and going, but with lots of little happy moments, if not “endings.” For those who say that kids should not be taught to expect happy endings in life, I’d say they should be allowed the uplifting pleasure of happy endings in stories, AND taught to both look for and create happy passages in real life.

It doesn’t matter so much that life isn’t “happy EVER after” ONE struggle. It does matter that we CAN get through a struggle, and be happy—and so then we must be able to get through another struggle, and another. A happy ending gives hope for multiple happy endings to multiple struggles.

So don’t feel guilty for filling your kid’s heads with happy endings. And do make happiness come true, even in difficult times.

.

©NPM

It’s been a very busy spring for me. I never meant to go so long without posting to this blog. But I’m coming back…

First stop was to check my other social sites (FaceBook, etc.), commenting on what others are up to and reposting some things I really enjoyed to FaceBook:
 http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003226279447

Next step is to add some valuable content to the web–some things I hope others will find helpful, or at least interesting. This is planned to happen really soon. I have lots of notes to edit into posts.

But right now I must complete an errand
Regarding a new business I am starting with a friend.
This will be a helpful business too,
And we hope it can help you.
I’ll let you know what it’s all about
Just as soon as the webpage is present to tout.
I have to finish drawing the logo,
And make sure the prices are in a row,
With a bit of fine print all in tow.
I have to finish the HTMLs
And double-check how everything spells.

(Yup, I checked, it spells “everything”. …..Just kidding.)

So, I’ll see you here again soon.

I’m excited!
.
.
© 2012 NPM
.
.

When “all options are on the table,” it is too easy to settle for the wrong option, thinking it’s the only viable or fast enough way.

When the wrong options are removed from the choices you make available to yourself, and the remaining selection isn’t appealing, you are forced to try to discover new options and good ways to enact the best option found.

Ozma of Oz would never have discovered a way to turn the evil spirits into agreeable spirits, if she had accepted the much-offered option of defensive fighting. Because she ruled out that response as not being an option, then she and her friends had time to notice not only a better solution, but one which might actually succeed; and then having chosen a good option, they were committed enough to give a needed nudge in the right place to make it work.

Think you can justify yourself in saying “all options are on the table” in order to surprise your enemies with your selected option? Never mind. Either you are willing to do anything to meet your goals, or else you are lying; and if you aren’t the type to choose wrong, then your opponent will know what is not really “on your table” anyway. You’ll have to do better than that to be surprising.

Don’t be lazy. Cast away wrong options for meeting your goals; then if you can’t find anything left, reconsider your goals and be patiently watchful for new options to arise.

© NPM

To see my books in print, please visit  www.Amazon.com  or www.BarnesAndNoble.com  OR visit my publisher’s website: www.rifll.com

 

How much sleep ever happens at a sleep-over? As little as possible!! “Wake-over” might be a more appropriate term, but that doesn’t sound good. Grow-ups would stop at the word “wake” and think someone died; and kids would think sleeplessness was encouraged.

When staying overnight with friends, even if put in bed with the lights out, kids stay awake and play for hours past their usual bed time, and then drag each other out of bed before the crack of dawn in order to make the most of their time together! During a 24-hour visit, kids are likely to sleep only 4-6 hours. That’s a 1:4 or even 1:6 ratio of sleep to play.

If you went to your job and only worked 2 out of 8 hours (or 2 out of 12 hours), wouldn’t that be called a working vacation day?

As a side note, the more deprived a child is of participating in sleep-overs, the less he or she is likely to actually sleep at one when given the chance. A child who regularly stays overnight at someone’s house, or who regularly has a child visit overnight, isn’t so excited and so is more likely to give in to the regular need of at least eight or nine hours of sleep.

So if the term “sleep-over” does not describe what happens at one, why is it used? Because it conveys that the child will be staying overnight, which doesn’t usually happen on “play-dates”.

So, how about a new term, “play-over” (as in, come play and stay overnight)?

…Nope, no one will bother to adopt a new term, especially when it’s fun to laugh at how little kids sleep on sleep-overs.